Monthly Archives: March 2003

90749653

Umpqua tribe, AFN providing phone service to school district

Cooperation between the City of Ashland and a Bend-based communications company will save the Ashland School District an estimated $45,000 over three years.

“I’m pleased in these days of financial woes, we can provide assistance to the schools,” Mayor Alan DeBoer said.

The district recently awarded its telephone service contract to Rio Communications, an integrated telecommunications service provider based in Bend. The company is in turn owned by the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians.

Rio will use the Ashland Fiber Network to provide service for 68 telephone lines at eight locations throughout the school district, replacing former provider Qwest by July.

The deal costs the school district about $28 per line, per month – costs which are expected to stay fairly level in the next few years, according to Rio Communication Sales Manager and Ashland High School Graduate Jeff Rhoden.

“We were really pleased we were able to win the bid,” Rhoden said. “The Ashland solution is special because the switch technology Rio is using allows us to deliver our services over AFN rather than utilizing traditional copper facilities.”

Rio Communications provides data and telecommunications services throughout Oregon, with offices in Bend, Eugene, Medford, Portland and Roseburg.

Ashland is the only city besides Tacoma, Wash., which supplies fiber to homes and businesses in the city limits. Because of the existing AFN infrastructure, the Ashland School District will get phone and telecommunications services at a lower cost, according to AFN Director Dick Wanderscheid.

“I’m pleased we’re able to forge, with Rio Communications’ assistance, this partnership between the City of Ashland and Ashland public schools,” Wanderscheid said. “It’s gratifying to see AFN bring about real solutions.”

The deal was welcomed by Ashland Schools Superintendent Juli Di Chiro.

“In times of financial constraints, we value close community partnerships,” Di Chiro said. “This is another example of us working together in a win-win situation.”

“Every little bit helps,” Di Chiro added.

The deal was aided by the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, which partially funded the changeover from regular analogue telephones in the district to digital units which could connect better with AFN.

The district had already been connected to the city’s AFN system, which it used for Internet connection services.

“As far as the technical parts, I still type on a manual typewriter,” Cow Creek Band Chairman Sue Shaffer said. “But from a tribal perspective, where we come from is where we are – the land of the Umpqua. Our focus is building people, and education is always a top priority.”

The Cow Creek Band, headquartered in Roseburg, owns several diverse businesses, including Seven Feathers Hotel & Casino Resort, Umpqua Indian Power Cooperative, Umpqua Indian Foods, and Seven Feathers Truck & Travel Center.

The Tribe also contributes regularly to nonprofit groups in Southern Oregon that support family and education.

By Myles Murphy Ashland Daily Tidings

http://www.dailytidings.com/2003/news0314/031403n2.shtml

90749653

Umpqua tribe, AFN providing phone service to school district

Cooperation between the City of Ashland and a Bend-based communications company will save the Ashland School District an estimated $45,000 over three years.

“I’m pleased in these days of financial woes, we can provide assistance to the schools,” Mayor Alan DeBoer said.

The district recently awarded its telephone service contract to Rio Communications, an integrated telecommunications service provider based in Bend. The company is in turn owned by the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians.

Rio will use the Ashland Fiber Network to provide service for 68 telephone lines at eight locations throughout the school district, replacing former provider Qwest by July.

The deal costs the school district about $28 per line, per month – costs which are expected to stay fairly level in the next few years, according to Rio Communication Sales Manager and Ashland High School Graduate Jeff Rhoden.

“We were really pleased we were able to win the bid,” Rhoden said. “The Ashland solution is special because the switch technology Rio is using allows us to deliver our services over AFN rather than utilizing traditional copper facilities.”

Rio Communications provides data and telecommunications services throughout Oregon, with offices in Bend, Eugene, Medford, Portland and Roseburg.

Ashland is the only city besides Tacoma, Wash., which supplies fiber to homes and businesses in the city limits. Because of the existing AFN infrastructure, the Ashland School District will get phone and telecommunications services at a lower cost, according to AFN Director Dick Wanderscheid.

“I’m pleased we’re able to forge, with Rio Communications’ assistance, this partnership between the City of Ashland and Ashland public schools,” Wanderscheid said. “It’s gratifying to see AFN bring about real solutions.”

The deal was welcomed by Ashland Schools Superintendent Juli Di Chiro.

“In times of financial constraints, we value close community partnerships,” Di Chiro said. “This is another example of us working together in a win-win situation.”

“Every little bit helps,” Di Chiro added.

The deal was aided by the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, which partially funded the changeover from regular analogue telephones in the district to digital units which could connect better with AFN.

The district had already been connected to the city’s AFN system, which it used for Internet connection services.

“As far as the technical parts, I still type on a manual typewriter,” Cow Creek Band Chairman Sue Shaffer said. “But from a tribal perspective, where we come from is where we are – the land of the Umpqua. Our focus is building people, and education is always a top priority.”

The Cow Creek Band, headquartered in Roseburg, owns several diverse businesses, including Seven Feathers Hotel & Casino Resort, Umpqua Indian Power Cooperative, Umpqua Indian Foods, and Seven Feathers Truck & Travel Center.

The Tribe also contributes regularly to nonprofit groups in Southern Oregon that support family and education.

By Myles Murphy Ashland Daily Tidings

http://www.dailytidings.com/2003/news0314/031403n2.shtml

111067651764874787

Umpqua tribe, AFN providing phone service to school district

“I’m pleased in these days of financial woes, we can provide assistance to the schools,”
Mayor Alan DeBoer said.

111067651764874787

Umpqua tribe, AFN providing phone service to school district

“I’m pleased in these days of financial woes, we can provide assistance to the schools,”
Mayor Alan DeBoer said.

111067637230948298

Oregon’s Taxes Declined for Rich, Rose For Poor and Middle Class over the 1990s
“The tax rate on poorest Oregonians is one and a half times the effective rate on the wealthiest Oregonians…”
http://www.ocpp.org/2003/nr030107.htm

111067637230948298

Oregon’s Taxes Declined for Rich, Rose For Poor and Middle Class over the 1990s
“The tax rate on poorest Oregonians is one and a half times the effective rate on the wealthiest Oregonians…”
http://www.ocpp.org/2003/nr030107.htm

90287463

What is RVML? The Rogue Valley Metaphysical Library (RVML) is a not-for-profit lending library providing easy access to books, videos, and audiocassette programs on a variety of metaphysical and paranormal subjects. In addition to the library functions, RVML also organizes special events and lectures including a weekly discussion group and video/lecture series. Funded by memberships, grants, and donations; the library serves the communities of Southern Oregon and Northern California.

Purpose: It is the library’s philosophy that our ability to discern truth is enhanced by exposure to a broader perspective on the human experience. As we integrate new truths into our awareness, the expansion of knowledge in the collective mind advances the evolution of human consciousness.
Library Resources: The lending library consists of over 2000 books, 300+ audiobooks, and 700+ videotapes on a variety of metaphysical and paranormal subjects including: spirituality, remote viewing, consciousness studies, prophecy, unexplained phenomena, UFOs, personal development, meditation, etc. In addition to the electronically searchable collection, patrons can use the high-speed internet terminals, the audio/visual stations, and the reading/study area. For meetings and events, RVML has a large meeting room and video projector, with seating for 75 people (handicapped accessible).
Community Events: RVML organizes a bi-weekly discussion group and a bi-weekly video/lecture series on alternating Tuesday nights (free admission). In addition to the Tuesday events, RVML also hosts weekly workshops, lectures, and meetings presented by other local groups. RVML also presents lectures and events periodically at other venues to accommodate larger audiences.

Location and Hours: RVML is located at 258 A Street #2 Ashland, Oregon 97520 (directly across from Ace Hardware, near Ashland Food Cooperative.) The library is open every day 2-6pm and Saturdays 10am-6pm. Please visit our website http://www.rvml.org or call (541) 552-9119 for more information.

RVML’s director, Jordan Pease said: “We are very pleased with the support and interest we have received from the community. I’m extremely grateful to all of our outstanding volunteers who have given so generously of their time and talents. We’re really blessed to have so many exceptional people contributing to the library. Without their dedication and hard work, this endeavor would never have been possible.”

Pease elaborated about the library automation system: “Our computer software and cataloging system is working very well. All the books are shelved using the Dewey Decimal system, and each item is bar-coded. Just like a real library! This facilitates easy inventory management and a quick check-out process. We are continually adding to our collection, and hope to expand our shelf space again as soon as we attract some more funding. Right now we have more books than can fit into the library, and because the videotapes are the most popular, we’re just storing the extra books to make room for all the videotapes.”

Pease added: “We’ve had about a year to grow the collection and fine-tune our operation. We’re finally ready to serve the community on a broader scale and we invite everyone to explore and enjoy the resource that we have created. We’re also grateful to our neighbors at Nuwandart Gallery, who have been extremely cooperative with sharing their gallery space for our meetings.”